The Central App

Learn Te reo


Kōrero‌ ‌Māori‌ ‌–‌ ‌Give‌ ‌te‌ ‌reo‌ ‌a‌ ‌go‌ ‌
Kōrero‌ ‌Māori‌ ‌–‌ ‌Give‌ ‌te‌ ‌reo‌ ‌a‌ ‌go‌ ‌

31 October 2021, 5:03 PM

Tēnā‌ ‌koutou‌ ‌-‌ ‌hello‌ ‌everyone.‌ ‌ ‌Kei‌ ‌te‌ ‌pēhea‌ ‌koe?‌‌ ‌How‌ ‌are‌ ‌you‌ ‌going‌ ‌in‌ ‌your‌ ‌te‌ ‌reo‌ ‌journey?‌ ‌ ‌ ‌I’m‌ ‌fairly‌ ‌new‌ ‌on‌ ‌my‌ ‌te‌ ‌reo‌ ‌journey,‌ ‌having‌ ‌arrived‌ ‌in‌ ‌New‌ ‌Zealand‌ ‌a‌ ‌bit‌ ‌over‌ ‌two‌ ‌years‌ ‌ago,‌ ‌I‌ ‌didn’t‌ ‌know‌ ‌any‌ ‌beforehand.‌ ‌ ‌Ko‌ ‌Rowan‌ ‌tōku‌ ‌ingoa.‌ ‌Ko‌ ‌wai‌ ‌tō‌ ‌ingoa?‌ ‌‌I’m‌ ‌Rowan.‌ ‌What’s‌ ‌your‌ ‌name?‌ ‌ ‌When‌ ‌you‌ ‌see‌ ‌me‌ ‌out‌ ‌and‌ ‌about,‌ ‌let’s‌ ‌practice‌ ‌a‌ ‌couple‌ ‌of‌ ‌ways‌ ‌to‌ ‌introduce‌ ‌ourselves‌ ‌to‌ ‌each‌ ‌other.‌ ‌ ‌Ko‌ ‌Rowan‌ ‌tōku‌ ‌ingoa.‌ ‌‌My‌ ‌name‌ ‌is‌ ‌Rowan.‌ ‌ ‌Nō‌ ‌Ahitereiria‌ ‌ōku‌ ‌tīpuna.‌ ‌‌My‌ ‌ancestors‌ ‌are‌ ‌from‌ ‌Australia.‌ ‌ ‌Kei‌ ‌te‌ ‌noho‌ ‌au‌ ‌ki‌ ‌Manuherekia.‌ ‌‌I‌ ‌live‌ ‌in‌ ‌Alexandra.‌ ‌ ‌ ‌Nō‌ ‌hea‌ ‌koe?‌‌ ‌Where‌ ‌are‌ ‌you‌ ‌from?‌ ‌ ‌Manuherekia‌ ‌‌is‌ ‌the‌ ‌Māori‌ ‌name‌ ‌for‌ ‌Alexandra,‌ ‌and‌ ‌it‌ ‌literally‌ ‌means‌ ‌‘tied‌ ‌here’.‌ ‌It‌ ‌is‌ ‌a‌ ‌name‌ ‌I‌ ‌will‌ ‌use‌ ‌more,‌ ‌as‌ ‌I‌ ‌have‌ ‌chosen‌ ‌to‌ ‌build‌ ‌my‌ ‌life‌ ‌here‌ ‌in‌ ‌Central‌ ‌Otago‌ ‌with‌ ‌home‌ ‌and‌ ‌family.‌ ‌ ‌Have‌ ‌fun‌ ‌introducing‌ ‌yourselves‌ ‌this‌ ‌week.‌ ‌See‌ ‌you‌ ‌next‌ ‌week!‌ ‌ ‌K‌a‌ ‌kite‌ ‌anō‌.‌ ‌ ‌For‌ ‌more,‌ ‌check‌ ‌out‌ ‌te‌ ‌wiki‌ ‌o‌ ‌te‌ ‌reo‌ ‌Māori‌ ‌‌here‌ 

Kōrero Māori – Give te reo a go
Kōrero Māori – Give te reo a go

17 October 2021, 7:51 PM

Tēnā koutou - hello everyone.Kei te pēhea koe? How are you going in your te reo journey?  Last week, we talked more about te huarere, the weather.This week, it’s national gardening week, so I thought we could kōrero a little about gardening.I te māra - In the gardenYates is giving away free seeds to encourage us to plant another row. So, let’s all whakatōkia tētahi kākano.Kākano is the word meaning seed. You’ll often see whaka put in front of adjectives or verbs to take on the meaning that something is being caused to happen, so whakatōkia means to plant.Whakatōkia tētahi kākano. Plant a seed.Kei te matewai ngā tupu. The plants are thirsty. Riringihia ki te wai. Sprinkle it with water.We learned above that whakatōkia is the verb meaning to plant.  The noun for ‘the plant’ is tupu.I know the word mate  (pronounced ma-te) as meaning ‘dead’ or ‘death’. However, when mate is joined to a noun like kai or wai, it indicates a desire, a need or a want for that thing.matewai - thirsty (wanting water)matekai - hungry (wanting food)Kei te matewai ngā tupu. The plants are thirsty. Riringihia ki te wai. Sprinkle it with water.Wai of course means water, but it’s interesting that Māori names for rivers and lakes start with wai and have one or more syllables added on. When this happens, the river’s name is describing the nature of its water.Waimakariri - cold waterWaikato - flowing waterAs for Te Wairere Lake Dunstan, according to the Māori dictionary, wairere means a stream of water, or waterfall. Very apt for a flowing lake that ends at a dam.Kōrero with a friend this week as you’re out in the garden. Ka pai ō mahi - Good work!  Nau mai te raumati. Bring on summer.For more, check out te wiki o te reo Māori here 

Kōrero Māori – Give te reo a go
Kōrero Māori – Give te reo a go

16 August 2021, 1:43 AM

Tēnā koutou - hello everyone.How are you going in your te reo journey?  It’s great to hear people giving te reo a go with me.I have had a question sent in to me, asking for some general, friendly phrases to use. So, let’s get friendly!Kei te pēhea koe?  How are you?  We learned this one previously, as a good follow-on from Kia ora. You can use it any time of the day - and quite often you hear it shortened to just kei te pēhea.  Leave off the pronoun, 'you', to keep it very informal and just say 'How's it?' Kei te pēhea? Kei te pai tō āhua - You're looking good. This is another dexterous phrase. It’s used to describe someone who's looking healthy and well. You can also use it for someone who you wouldn't mind getting to know a little better. The last time I heard this phrase used, it was a friend I hadn't seen in a while. He said, “Kei te pai tō āhua.”  So, he could have been talking about my physical appearance, or perhaps my happy, healthy glow. What if you're out at a party and spot someone you quite like the look of? You could saunter over with a cheeky wee “Kei te pai tō āhua."  And maybe follow it up with a smile and a little wink!  Kia pai te rā - Have a good day. There's a familiar word in this phrase - pai, which means 'good'. Ra is 'day' - so we're telling someone to have a good day: Kia pai te rā. It's a sentence that can be used at any time of day - and it’s also useful in a variety of situations. You'll normally hear it when you're saying goodbye to someone. I use it to sign off my emails, as well as at the end of phone conversations. We can also substitute the word rā with other words. If we want to say, ‘have a good meeting’,  Kia pai te hui. ‘Have a good trip’ is, Kia pai te haere.  So, we can change that last word to fit many different contexts. If it’s late in the day, you can also change ra for po, which means night. Kia pai te rā. Have a great day.Check out te wiki o te reo Māori here 

Kōrero Māori – Give te reo a go
Kōrero Māori – Give te reo a go

01 August 2021, 6:39 PM

Tēnā koutou - hello everyone.How are you going in your Te Reo journey?  It’s great to hear people giving Te Reo Māori a go with me.I hope you enjoyed last week’s story about Kōpuwai. I was asked how people could begin to use Te Reo in their business, so I thought I would tell you some of the ways I use Te Reo in a business context. I hope you get some ideas that you can use.Mihi atu, mihi mai - Meet and greetAs with English, and indeed most languages, when you are meeting someone, or answering the phone there is a distinction between a formal greeting and more relaxed greetings.When answering the phone, how do you want to sound?Tēnā koe is a more formal greeting, as opposed to the less formal Kia ora.Writing emails and lettersIf you want to be fairly formal, you might begin your email with the greeting: Tēnā koe (person’s name). It’s a bit like writing Dear … at the beginning of your email.If your email is to two people, you should use Tēnā kōrua, as explained in our previous Kōrero on greetings.A more informal email might open with Kia ora. This can refer to any number of people, so there’s no change needed if you’re writing to one person or a group of people.If you’re writing a very formal email or letter, one that you might open in English with Dear Sir/Madam, you could use: E te rangatira, tēnā koe. Rangatira literally means chief, and can refer to either a man or a woman.As in English, there are many different ways to sign off your letters and emails using Te Reo.Want to be formal?Nāku, nā     Yours faithfullyNāku noa, nā     Yours sincerelyIf you began your email with the more informal Kia ora, you might want to end with:Hei konā mai    Goodbye for now, orHei konā mai me te aroha    With love, orKia rongo kōrero anō au i a koe    Until I hear from you again.If you want your sign off to convey a feeling of gratitude, you can use an expression such as:Nāku i runga i aku mihi ki a koe    Yours with thanks.If you want to explore te reo for your business in more depth, the Māori Language Commission Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Māori  has published a useful book entitled Māori for the Office, Te Reo Māori mō te Tari.Kia pai te rā. Have a great day.Check out te wiki o te reo Māori here 

Kōrero Māori – Give te reo a go
Kōrero Māori – Give te reo a go

11 July 2021, 5:25 PM

Tēnā koutou - hello everyone.I’m on a personal journey to learn more about te reo and the Māori world, and it’s great to have you travel with me.For the past few weeks, we’ve been answering questions sent in to us, mainly around the meanings of words we hear often in conversation, or on the news. This week, I was asked if I could look at a few more place names around the district. Ōtūrēhua was initially called Rough Ridge. In 1907, it’s name reverted to the original Māori with the advent of rail in the region. Historically for Māori there was a huge dependence on memory and the careful oral transmission of history from generation to generation. Place names were like survey pegs of memory, recording an important aspect of history, events or landscape for an area.Ōtūrēhua refers to the stars, in particular Rēhua, or the star Antares. ō means place of, tū means to stand, so all together the name Ōtūrēhua means ‘Place where the summer star stands still’.Because he lives in the highest of the skies, Rēhua is untouched by death, and has power to cure blindness, revive the dead, and heal any disease (Orbell 1998:119-120). Rēhua is also the ancestor of Maui.Associate professor at the University of Waikato Dr Rangi Matamua says there are nine stars in the Matariki constellation - seven children and their parents. Matariki (Alcyone) is the mother of the other stars and Rēhua (Antares), although not usually considered part of the Matariki constellation, is the father. Twinkling in the winter sky just before dawn, we know Matariki (the Pleiades) signals the Māori New Year. For Māori, the appearance of Matariki heralds a time of remembrance, joy and peace. It is a time for communities to come together and celebrate. The sky was particularly important to Māori, as it signals the changes in season, which are so vital to Māori engaged in agriculture, fishing or hunting. Matariki is read in combinations, comparing parts of the whole. If one star is brighter than the others, food from that source would be plentiful or the weather would be good. But if a star is dim or missing, the outcomes represented by that star will be negative in the coming year.From 2022, a public holiday marking Matariki will be held in June or July each year. Kia pai te rā. Have a great day.Check out te wiki o te reo Māori here 

Kōrero Māori – Give te reo a go
Kōrero Māori – Give te reo a go

06 July 2021, 8:22 PM

Tēnā koutou - hello everyone.I’m on a personal journey to learn more about te reo and the Māori world, and it’s great to have you travel with me.For the past few weeks, we’ve been answering questions sent in to us, mainly around the meanings of words we hear often in conversation, or on the news.This week, I received the question: Are there swear words in te reo Māori?For me, the better question to explore is, are there words or phrases in the te reo language that could be considered offensive?Then, my next questions are, what makes them offensive, and why would we want to use them?Being a journalist, I first went to the Broadcasting Standards Authority to check out the results of their latest survey on offensive language. It’s an interesting read.The results show that as a nation, we’re changing in how and why we take offence.I noted two particular trends. Some “traditional” swear words and blasphemies have become more acceptable to the general population here in Aotearoa. However, perceptions of offense relating to bigotry are changing significantly. Words with their roots in bigotry are becoming less and less acceptable, to the point where new words are being added to the BSA’s lists.For the first time, te reo swear words have been included. The Māori Dictionary describes pōkokohua as a very strong curse, an insulting swear word, an expression of anger.  Although the literal translation of a boiled head doesn’t really capture the strength of emotion and the context of why it is offensive. But it most certainly is in a traditional te reo context because the head is tapu - and we learned about the significance of tapu last week.To boil someone’s head would have been the ultimate insult.Warning: I’m about to use some racially offensive words.There are still some aspects to all this I find quite shocking. The BSA survey results highlight the falling number of people who find racial or homophobic slurs acceptable - however almost ten percent of respondents still used words like ‘nigger’ or ‘chink’ in all contexts, and over 16 percent regularly used the word ‘coconut’.The other aspect I have thought about is that when learning a new language, why would we feel the need to learn how to be offensive?We absolutely should be understanding and discussing what we find offensive, and why. These sorts of conversations need to happen in order to build more cohesive communities, particularly as Aotearoa becomes increasingly multicultural and diverse. I found the BSA survey to be a fascinating snapshot of social attitudes in our country. I would like to get to the point in my learning journey where I can joke and banter in te reo Māori. I won’t intentionally offend.I’m learning te reo because I want to understand more about the wonderful place I live, its fascinating history, its people and the language my mother spoke when she was alive.I am also learning a lot from Māori traditions, customs and view of the world. Concepts such as whanaungatanga, the importance of family, manaakitanga, caring, and the importance of caring for our environment, starting with our own neighbourhood.Simple acts like using Māori names and words make a difference. It’s a bit like somebody walking into a room and using your name, it shows respect and care.Why are you learning te reo? Kia pai te wiki. Have a great week.Check out te wiki o te reo Māori here 

1-19 of 19