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John Roche into Central sports hall of fame
John Roche into Central sports hall of fame

21 May 2024, 5:45 PM

Alexandra golfer John Roche (81) was named in the hall of fame at the Central Otago Sports Awards recently.John said it was an honour to receive the plaudit for the game of golf.A group of mates said to join them for a round in Wānaka on Friday and to bring a shirt and tie along as they were heading out for dinner afterwards.“I was more than very surprised to get the award,” he said. John’s life in golf began as a caddy for his dad at Dunedin’s Chisholm Park. At the age of eight or nine he would carry the clubs in the freezing wind for a hot pie and a glass of lemonade.He had no idea that would lead him to a “very satisfying career” in Central’s “perfect climate for golf” as a professional.At Kings High school he played cricket and rugby, and after his school years he took up golf.Career highlights of his younger years are representing Otago for 10 years, winning the New Zealand University Championship in 1962 in Christchurch, and gaining selection into the Australasian University team.“I was awarded a university blue which I was very proud of.”The "blue" was a prestigious award for excellence in sport and recognised national excellence through to world champions. In 1971, in Central Otago he turned professional and was encouraged to do so by orchardist Jeff Taylor and accountant John Weaver.“There were no other golf pros outside of Dunedin and Christchurch in the whole of the South Island.”He used to organise popular golf tours in the 1970s, taking bus loads of golfers to Roxburgh, Alexandra, Cromwell, Wānaka and Queenstown.Eight months of the year, every Monday he would travel to a different Central Otago location “Ranfurly, Roxburgh, Queenstown and all the places in between” and run coaching sessions.   A stint away from Central took his family to Hamilton, where they bought and ran Westlands Golf Course. Together with wife Dawn, he moved back to Central to retire in 2005. He gave up his professional status in 2000 and “struck form” again, rekindling his passion for playing, after being on the business side of golf when he owned the course.“I managed to get into the New Zealand senior team for over 50s, I was 65 at the time. “I went to Bangalore in India as part of a six-man team. We won the trophy for the 13th Asia Pacific Senior Amateur Golf Championships [in 2007].”  John with the plate he won in Bangalore as an senior amateur. PHOTO: The Central AppCoaching has been another aspect of his golfing life he has found rewarding.“Seeing the benefit you can make to people as they improve . . . it can help make the walk more pleasant. [Coaching] is a pleasure you can’t put money or time on.”Until two years ago John was coaching for free on Sundays and he still runs a ‘swingers’ group for lady golfers of around 15 participants at a time.He’s been recognised with a life membership of the Alexandra Golf Club, and been on the board of the New Zealand Golf Association while he was pro and contributed to Golf Otago, and the New Zealand Golf Council (the group for amateur golfers).He’s left his mark on many tournaments in the region including the Central Otago Charity Golf Classic, the Sunshine Classic, the Golf Trilogy in Wānaka and Central Otago. “I’ve just resigned from the committee of the senior tournament, at 81, fairly pleased to hand it over.”The Central App asked the grandfather of five if he’s still playing.“Once or twice a week, I still play and I enjoy it . . . I try to do better, try to improve, otherwise you might as well not be there.“As long as I can walk around a golf course I’ll keep playing.”His advice for those still learning, “there’s nobody I’ve ever struck that can’t play golf . . . be prepared in golf not to panic and yes, you’ll have some bad days.”

Central police investigate burglary
Central police investigate burglary

21 May 2024, 5:30 PM

A burglary and fire are among the incidents that have kept Central police busy over the past week.In Cromwell, a commercial property in Ripponvale Road was broken into last week where a gun safe and electric bike were stolen.Alexandra Police Senior Constable Graham Perkins said the gun safe was recovered leaning up against a tree in a shelter belt the following day, but no access had been gained.The Trek e-bike was taken without its battery, and police said it appeared the offenders had gained entry through the back of the property.No forensic testing was carried out because it had been wet overnight, and Snr Const Perkins said the incident was quite an isolated one, as burglaries didn’t happen very often in Central Otago.Police and fire attended an incident at the Roxburgh Trotting Club on May 20 after a drum with rubbish inside caught fire.Snr Const Perkins said the incident happened after a function overnight and club members had gone back to clean up, “and it looks like cigarettes and ash have made it go up.”A member of the public alerted emergency services to the fire, which could be seen from the road.Snr Const Perkins said one moment’s inattention could’ve set the entire building ablaze, with dire consequences.A final message from police about winter road conditions following Central Otago’s snow day last week: four drivers were stopped and given a ticket for speeding and not driving to the conditions.Winter and foggy days are upon us, prompting a message from police to make sure your vehicle is prepared for winter conditions, and your headlights are working. PHOTO: FileSnr Const Perkins said the roads have been slippery and some vehicles have been found with only one headlight working, which was unsafe, particularly on foggy days.Remember, lights on an hour before dawn and an hour before dusk.

Importance of Business Protection (sponsored)
Importance of Business Protection (sponsored)

21 May 2024, 5:15 PM

In the dynamic and unpredictable world of business, safeguarding your business is not just a prudent decision—it's essential.Business protection encompasses a range of strategies and tools designed to shield your company from various risks, ensuring longevity and stability.Whether it's natural disasters, legal issues, or unforeseen economic downturns, robust business protection can mean the difference between weathering the storm and shutting your doors permanently.Effective business protection involves a comprehensive risk management approach. This includes implementing security measures, establishing contingency plans, and, crucially, obtaining the right insurance coverage.If you, as a business owner, proactively address potential threats, you can focus on growth and innovation, and feel confident that your business is well-protected.What Types Of Business Insurance Do You Need?Understanding the types of insurance your business needs can be overwhelming, but it's a vital step in comprehensive business protection.Here are some key types of business protection insurance every business should consider:General Liability Insurance: This is fundamental for covering potential legal issues arising from accidents, injuries, or claims of negligence.Property Insurance: Protects your physical assets, including buildings, equipment, and inventory, against damage or loss from unforeseen events like fire, theft, and natural disasters.Professional Liability Insurance: Also known as Errors and Omissions Insurance, this covers legal costs and damages if your business is sued for negligence or inadequate work.Business Interruption Insurance: Compensates for loss of income and operating expenses if your business is forced to shut down temporarily due to a covered event.Cyber Liability Insurance: As cyber threats become increasingly prevalent, this insurance protects against data breaches and other cyber incidents.Each business has unique needs based on its size, industry, and specific risk factors. Consulting with a knowledgeable insurance broker can help tailor coverage to your particular circumstancesWhy Insurance Cover Is ImportantInsurance plays a crucial role in business protection. It provides a financial safety net, enabling businesses to recover more quickly from disruptions.Without adequate insurance, a single incident could potentially cripple your business, leading to significant financial loss or even closure.Insurance protection also fosters trust and credibility with clients and partners. Demonstrating that you have comprehensive coverage reassures stakeholders that you are prepared for any eventuality, thus enhancing your business reputation.Moreover, many forms of insurance are legally required, such as workers' compensation and commercial auto insurance. Compliance with these regulations not only avoids legal penalties, but also promotes a safe and fair working environment.In essence, insurance is not just an expense—it's an investment in the resilience and sustainability of your business.Contact C&R Insurance BrokersNavigating the complexities of business insurance can be daunting, but you don't have to do it alone. At C&R Insurance Brokers, we specialise in helping businesses identify and secure the coverage they need.Our experienced team is committed to providing personalised service and expert advice to protect your business against the unexpected.Contact us today to discuss your insurance needs and safeguard your business's future. Commercial - Horticulture & Viticulture - Rural - Personal - Life & Health - Income Protection

Bumz on Bikez benefits from road safety workshop
Bumz on Bikez benefits from road safety workshop

21 May 2024, 5:15 PM

“Take the lane, you have every right to be there” was one of the main messages to a group of cyclists in a road safety workshop yesterday.Fulton Hogan provided a truck and trailer for road safety sessions hosted at Alexandra’s Molyneux Park on Tuesday and Wednesday. Central Otago District Council (CODC) road safety advisor Chris Foggin (Foggie) was happy with the turnout of 14 cyclists from Bumz on Bikez, a group based in Central.They attended at 12.15pm after 11 Alexandra Primary School Year 7 and 8 students participated in the first workshop.Everyone had a turn climbing into the truck's cab, to check out what they could and couldn't see in the mirrors around the vehicle. Alexandra cyclist Yvonne Kidd experienced the view of a truck driver and saw the blind spots missed by the truck’s mirrors. PHOTO: The Central AppShare the Road workshop lead Kelvin Aris Kelvin explained how the truck's left-hand side is “unmistakably the blind zone”, and the driver can barely see cyclists down this side. PHOTO: The Central APPThe free workshops were supported by ‘Share the Road NZ’, held during national Road Safety Week. Participants could ask questions at the end, and topics such as biking over the Clyde and Alexandra bridges, bike lane etiquette, navigating round-abouts and left turning corners were covered.The workshop gave people insights into how to be safe around heavy vehicles, particularly the more vulnerable road users such as cyclists, walkers or horse riders.‘Wheels Up’ is a new campaign to help Central Otago residents become more road savvy, which was funded through Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency, initiated by the Central Otago District Council (CODC), and led by CODC road safety advisor Foggie.Foggie said learning about heavy vehicle blind zones, and how to safely share the road was important for everyone including truck drivers and vulnerable road users such as cyclists, horse riders or walkers. Today (Wednesday May 22) more students from Alexandra Primary School and operations managers from local companies Trail Journeys and NZ Bike Trails are attending workshops. Kelvin said he had been delivering the workshops since 2019 and he loved his job as he got to travel around beautiful locations and meet a wide range of people from school students, to truck drivers, mountain bikers and retirees.Bumz on Bikez meet up for bike rides several times a week, and in the summer months as many as 30 people regularly attend. Organiser Gaynor said they often visit local cafes after their rides and they all enjoy staying fit and being social.Chris Foggin (Foggie), well known cycling advocate and CODC road safety advisor. PHOTO: Supplied To find out more email [email protected] tuned to The Central App for an interview with Foggie on The Outlet podcast this Friday, May 24. 

Properties for Sale @ Tall Poppy Real Estate (sponsored)
Properties for Sale @ Tall Poppy Real Estate (sponsored)

21 May 2024, 3:16 PM

Tranquil Country Living187 Blackman Road, AlexandraEnquiries over $1,100,000This cozy home boasts 3 bedrooms and 1 bathroom, making it perfect for a family seeking comfort and tranquility. The interior features a log-burner and 2 heat-pumps with some double glazing, ensuring warmth and comfort all year round. Click here for more information or to contact the agent Peter Hishon.Brimming with Character22 Bringans Street, AlexandraEnquiries over $720,000Welcome to 22 Bringans Street, where charm, character, and comfort intersect to create the perfect home for you. This immaculate 1930s villa boasts a multitude of features that will appeal to discerning buyers seeking a blend of functionality and space. Click here for more information or to contact the agent Peter Hishon.Bareland Lifestyle in AlexandraLot 1 Letts Gully Road, AlexandraBuyer Enquiry over $515,0001.5 hectares (subject to title) nestled on Letts Gully Road this bareland lifestyle awaits its new owner. Ideal property to build your dream lifestyle or landbank for future and run a few sheep in the meantime. This block comes with power to the boundary and its own bore with 25,000 litres per day. Building platform has been cut out so you have a great base to start. Click here for more information or to contact the agent Stacey Waldron and Rebecca Ireland.Cute Retreat with Potential!50 Ray Street, CromwellEnquiries over $670,000Step into potential with this charming 3-bedroom home nestled in the sought-after enclave of 'Old Cromwell'. While currently rented, this property presents an opportunity for buyers to unlock its true value through a little TLC. Click here for more information or to contact the agent Kate Andrew.Room to Move50 Ngapara Street, AlexandraEnquiries over $695,000Welcome to 50 Ngapara Street, Alexandra - a stunning property that epitomizes modern living in a large peaceful setting. Situated in a private leg in section and tranquil location, and offers a harmonious blend of comfort and style. Click here for more information or to contact the agent Peter Hishon.Dunstan Delight22 Dunstan Street, ClydeEnquiries over $690,000This well presented property offers a blend of modern living and convenience in a sought-after location. Upon arrival, you are greeted by a large spacious section, separate double garage with power, providing ample space for your vehicles or storage needs. The driveway offers additional off-street parking, ensuring convenience for residents and visitors alike. Click here for more information or to contact the agent Peter Hishon.Driving for Perfection on Old Golf Course Road10 Old Golf Course Road, AlexandraEnquiries over $2,100,000Escape to the perfect blend of comfort and style, town and lifestyle, on the edge of the picturesque Alexandra basin. Taking in the current beautiful Autumn colours, the stunning surrounding landscapes, views, all day sun you can indulge in the serenity of this executive 4-bedroom, 2-bathroom oasis boasting spacious living areas including a separate lounge for cozy nights by the open fire. Click here for more information or to contact the agent Peter Hishon.Family approved!9 Kohinoor Lane, CromwellEnquiries over $1,035,000Nestled in the coveted Prospectors Park, in Central Cromwell - an easy walking distance from Lake Dunstan, Heritage Precinct, Golf Course, Shops and more. Our latest listing will excite families looking for a home with space, flexibility and all the mod cons in a central location. Click here for more information or to contact the agent Keeley Anderson and Siobhan Ramage.Discover Cromwell Living Today!7 Electric Place, CromwellDeadline SaleStep into luxury through an enticing entrance to your newly expanded garage, perfect for all your vehicles and storage needs. Fully fenced for peace of mind, your furry friends can roam freely in the lush, landscaped yard, kept vibrant and green with efficient irrigation. Click here for more information or to contact the agent Kate Andrew.Contemporary Home With Ample Space!30 Ethereal Crescent, Mount PisaDeadline SaleStep into a modern contemporary masterpiece offering fabulous views and an expansive living experience. This remarkable home, built approximately in 2018, is perfectly situated close to the serene lake and scenic Dunstan trail, in Pisa Moorings, just 15 minutes from Cromwell and approximately 50 minutes from Wanaka and Queenstown. ensuring both convenience and tranquility. Click here for more information or to contact the agent Kate Andrew.Good Starter Or Holiday Home7 Old Bridge Road, AlexandraDeadline SaleA family home nestled in a peaceful neighborhood. This property offers a comfortable and convenient lifestyle, with easy access to the river and cycle trail. Click here for more information or to contact the agent Stacey Waldron and Rebecca Ireland.Cromwell Lifestyle Opportunity94 Pearson Road, CromwellDeadline SaleWelcome to 94 Pearson Road. Ideal for those seeking an orchard lifestyle with income potential, as well as homeowners yearning for a harmonious blend of comfort, sustainability, and breathtaking natural surroundings. Click here for more information or to contact the agent Kate Andrew.A Spectacular Luxury Pisa Home!39 Missy Crescent, Mount PisaEnquiries Over $1,525,000Behind the private high fence is a spectacularly luxurious family home located in affluent and desirable Pisa Moorings, one of the most admired and sought-after areas in the region, nestled on the edge of Lake Dunstan - a short drive from Cromwell, Queenstown, and Wanaka. Click here for more information or to contact the agent Keeley Anderson and Siobhan Ramage.Families Get Excited!69 Wallis Drive, CromwellEnquiries Over $1,265,000Families looking to upsize or relocate to Central will get excited with our latest listing in popular Prospectors Park. A short walk to Lake Dunstan, the Cromwell Golf Course, Schools, supermarket, and more - this four-bedroom modern and substantial home will exceed expectations. Click here for more information or to contact the agent Keeley Anderson and Siobhan Ramage.Rural Oasis: The Station Retreat In Omakau11 Half Time Close, OmakauEnquiries Over $1,000,000Escape to your own rural oasis at "The Station" retreat in Omakau. This exceptional property offers a perfect blend of rustic charm and modern luxury, providing a sanctuary for relaxation and leisure. Click here for more information or to contact the agent Peter Hishon.OPEN HOMESOpen HomesNOW SOLD

Central children brave frost for rugby tournament
Central children brave frost for rugby tournament

20 May 2024, 5:45 PM

Fifty five teams from Central primary schools scored hundreds of tries in the annual Dunstan zone rippa rugby tournament at Alexandra’s Molyneux Park on Friday.The morning was freezing with a frost of about -4 degrees Celsius in Alexandra, but by 11am the temperature had climbed to 3C. Teams came from Alexandra Primary, Clyde School, Cromwell College, Cromwell Primary School (CPA), Goldfields Primary, St Gerards, St Johns, The Terrace School (TTS), Maniototo Area School, Millers Flat, Omakau School, Poolburn School, and Roxburgh Area School (RAS).The Terrace School teacher and sports representative Mike Dalgliesh has organised the tournament on his own for the past five years. He said many people helped bring it all together on the day including parents, team coaches and managers, the 19 Dunstan High School year 9 and 10 students who volunteered as referees, the 10 year eight TTS students who helped with scorecards and TTS parent teacher association (PTA) helpers on the fundraising food stall.Watch a short video of the day’s highlights (1 min and 20 secs). VIDEO: The Central App Blue skies broke out mid-morning on Friday in Alexandra.Millers Flat School students were (from left) Lara Brennan (10), Lucy Dawson (10), Ella Anderson (10) and Lucy MacCorkindale (9).Clyde School girls enjoying some lollies in between games were (from left) Niley Paulin (10), Maddie Petersen-Young (10), Zara Wing (10), Sasha Thomas (11) and Charlotte Spence (11.)Each team played about four games over the course of the morning and the semi-finals and final rounds were played from 1.30pm. Students told The Central App it was a great game to play and they were enjoying cheering on their mates, and practicing new skills of ripping, passing and dodging. Rippa is a safe easy to play version of rugby, without tackling or any physical contact and tries are worth five points. To prevent a try being scored the defenders must rip the flag from the belt of the ball carrier. This forces the ball carrier to pass the ball. Six rips against the attacking team in one set of possession results in the ball being turned over to the other team. Seven players are on the field for each team at a time, and there needs to be a minimum of three girls in each team. There is no kicking and like normal rugby the ball needs to be passed in a backwards direction.The 2024 winners were; CPS Molyneux, Goldfields defenders, TTS tigers (year three and four first, second and third); Goldfields, St Johns green, St Gerard’s mako (Year 5 and 6 first, second and third; RAS yellow, St Gerard’s Taniwha, Cromwell yellow (year seven and eight first, second and third).Roxburgh Area School team yellow, topped in the year seven and eight category.The winning Year 5 and 6, and Year 7 and 8 teams from the Dunstan zone tournament will face winners from Wakatipu and Upper Clutha zones in Queenstown for the overall Central Otago rippa rugby title on Friday, June 7.PHOTOS/VIDEO: The Central App 

Positive outcome from drink driving blitz
Positive outcome from drink driving blitz

20 May 2024, 5:30 PM

A total of 245 vehicles coming into and leaving Alexandra on Friday night were stopped by police as part of a drink-driving blitz, and not one person was over the limit.Alexandra Police Senior Constable Graham Perkins said the checkpoint, on State Highway 8 before the golf course, found only four people who were all under 250mcg.Resources were brought in from Roxburgh and the rural police team, with a very positive result, he said.However, further north on the same night, a man was stopped driving 118km/hr between Pisa and Cromwell, with an excess breath alcohol reading of 367mcg.  He was given a $500 infringement fee and 50 demerit points.Earlier in the week on May 14, a motorist in the Cromwell Gorge was stopped by police after a member of the public reported him dangerously overtaking another vehicle.Snr Const Perkins said the incident happened in fog and he was located at McNulty Inlet, where police found his vehicle was not up to warrant of fitness standard.His car was green stickered and he was also given a ticket for the dangerous manoeuvre.  Snr Const Perkins said his tyres were bald and the vehicle had a cracked windscreen, which would’ve impaired his vision.On Saturday night two people were processed for drinking driving after leaving a Cromwell pub, which police said was starting to become a common occurrence from patrons at that particular establishment.“If you are seen leaving a hotel in a vehicle, you will be stopped,” Const Perkins said.

The Perils of Purchasing a Vehicle Privately in New Zealand Without a PPSR Search (sponsored)
The Perils of Purchasing a Vehicle Privately in New Zealand Without a PPSR Search (sponsored)

20 May 2024, 5:15 PM

Buying a vehicle privately can be an exciting endeavour, whether you're upgrading your ride or purchasing your first car. In New Zealand, the process is straightforward, with a myriad of options available across online platforms, classifieds, and local advertisements. However, amidst the thrill of finding your dream vehicle, there lies a hidden danger that many buyers overlook: the risk of purchasing a vehicle without conducting a Personal Property Securities Register (PPSR) search.The PPSR is a tool designed to protect consumers by providing them with essential information about the financial history of a vehicle. It allows buyers to uncover any outstanding debts, loans, or security interests associated with the vehicle they intend to purchase. Despite its importance, many individuals bypass this vital step, often due to a lack of awareness or a desire to expedite the purchasing process. However, the consequences of neglecting a PPSR search can be severe. One of the primary risks of buying a vehicle without a PPSR search is unwittingly inheriting the previous owner's debts or financial liabilities. Without conducting a thorough check, buyers may remain unaware of any existing loans secured against the vehicle. In such cases, the creditor retains the legal right to repossess the vehicle, even if it has changed hands and been in your ownership for several years.This scenario not only results in financial loss but also leaves the buyer without legal recourse. By verifying the vehicle's history through the PPSR database, buyers can ensure that it is free from any undisclosed security interests or ownership disputes. Additionally, the PPSR search enables buyers to confirm the vehicle's identification details, including its make, model, and VIN (Vehicle Identification Number), reducing the risk of purchasing a stolen vehicle. Fortunately, conducting a PPSR search is a relatively simple and cost-effective process, with online services available to facilitate the search. By entering the vehicle's registration number, VIN or chassis number and paying a nominal fee (currently $2.30), buyers can access comprehensive information about the vehicle's financial history. It is also a good idea to search the seller's name and company. Your local lawyers can assist with the PPSR search process and provide advice on your rights, if your vehicle is repossessed. 

Alexandra hosts line dancing social
Alexandra hosts line dancing social

20 May 2024, 5:15 PM

Line dancing has traditionally been done behind closed doors, but now the clubs are filling up and in Australia they do it in the streets.It was Alexandra's turn to host a Line dancing social on Saturday, which attracted 120 participants from all over the South Island.Held in the Terrace School Hall and led by local instructor Cherie Nicolson, they were busting out the Charleston and many other waltz and box steps at the weekend.The Alexandra club has about 35 active members who practice up to three times a week under Cherie, who has been dancing for 25 years.Cherie was taught by Barbara McCabe who first started the Alexandra club, which incorporates members from Clyde and Cromwell as well.“It brings everybody together. It’s a real friendship thing,” she said.Alexandra Line Dancing club instructor Cherie Nicholson (centre) with members Donna Bain (left) and Julie Davie.Line dancing has different levels depending on how technical the dance is, with participants starting at beginner and working through into improver, intermediate, high intermediate and advanced.Club member Julie Davie said it was very popular in Australia where there are competitions, but in New Zealand it was more recreational, with socials held around the country most weekends.A good line dancing space needs plenty of room and a good soft floor - no partners are required, and at the weekend’s social there were at least 10 men involved as well.Line dancers kick their heels up in Alexandra during a gathering last weekend. VIDEO: The Central AppComing from Darfield, Nelson, Invercargill, Oamaru, Mosgiel and Bannockburn, there were many groups of women from all ages, along with a few young males in their 30s right up to 70s.Julie is a retired nurse who lives in Clyde and now has a group of five on her street involved every week. The husbands come too but they make the afternoon tea.Cherie said line dancing used to have such a stigma and wasn’t often talked about, but some clubs such as Darfield now have waiting lists of people wanting to join and learn the moves.“In Tamworth they had 6000 people doing it in the streets,” she said.

Simplifying Wealth Management for Long-Term Success (sponsored)
Simplifying Wealth Management for Long-Term Success (sponsored)

20 May 2024, 5:13 PM

At Collinson Wealth Partners we take a holistic approach to personal finance with emphasis on simplicity, common sense, and a long-term perspective.We believe with this approach; you are less inclined to take the wrong path and get distracted from securing your financial future, which in this business is an easy thing to do with all the noise and emotions involved when it comes to money!Build Wealth Through Emotional IntelligenceBuilding wealth is a process of consistent saving, investing and adhering to a well-thought-out plan, regardless of market fluctuations.Emotional intelligence - more so than just intellectual intelligence - is the key to your financial future, especially when making investment decisions. But it is also the hardest part. Controlling your emotions and avoiding the temptation of jumping in and jumping out of the market is crucial to financial success.Wealth accumulation is best done gradually with patience, discipline and a focus on setting and achieving personal and financial goals. Align Level of Risk with Life StageAnother complication is that life experience shapes our perception of potential risk. Our capacity and need to take financial risks should be aligned with our stage in life, financial situation, objectives, and individual risk tolerance.At the end of the day, we are all mostly looking for financial security and peace of mind. This can be achieved by creating a financial plan resilient enough to withstand market uncertainties, while being flexible enough to adapt to individual needs. Keep It SimpleThe modern financial landscape provides us with opportunities and challenges. The ease of automating investments and a wide range of financial products can be a positive and a negative.Automation can simplify the process, but new investment options can overcomplicate and cause you to deviate from your wealth plan.Most success comes from getting the plan and financial goals right at the beginning, and then letting time and compounding do the heavy lifting, without getting interrupted by new investment strategies/products, ideas, or attempts to time the market. SummarySo, the keys to wealth management are understanding the physiological aspect of investing, the value of keeping it simple and maintaining focus on the long term. This is where advice from an experienced and knowledgeable investment specialist can make all the difference.We at Collinson Wealth believe our core value lies in helping clients create their financial plan and keep their focus on what is important to them in the long term; keeping them from being distracted by the noise and promise of instant wealth which appears so prevalent in the modern investment environment.The information contained in this publication is general in nature and is not intended to be personalised financial advice. Before making any financial decisions, you should consult a professional financial adviser.Collinson Wealth Partners FSP 743091 believes the information in this publication is correct, and it has reasonable grounds for any opinion or recommendation contained in this publication on the date of this publication.  

In-home educators needed across Central
In-home educators needed across Central

19 May 2024, 5:45 PM

An early learning provider is answering the call from young families who are desperately searching for childcare options in Central Otago.A shortage of childcare availability across the district has prompted Barnardos Early Learning to reach out to people in the community who might be interested in becoming an in-home provider.Barnardos Early Learning service delivery manager Rebecca Chatwin said the not-for-profit organisation’s priority has been to expand its home-based network.The service provides care for up to four tamariki in a familiar home environment, allowing for smaller groups and an individualised approach.Barnardos is recruiting new home-based educators in Roxburgh, Clyde and Alexandra, as well as in Wānaka, Hāwea and Queenstown.Rebecca was hopeful there could eventually be someone in each of those towns.“While having educators in every town might not be immediately achievable, it’s definitely our long-term vision. By actively recruiting and expanding our network, we aim to provide whānau in all Central Otago communities with access to early learning options, regardless of their location.”The move comes following a shortage of availability at some of the district’s early childhood centres.Among those with waitlists is Alexandra’s Little Oaks Early Learning Centre, which is full until the end of next year.Barnardos is working to recruit more in-home education providers to help ease the pressure on young families, and education centres across Central. PHOTO: BarnardosBestStart Alexandra also has a wait list and is regularly fielding requests from parents.A spokesperson for the centre said some parents are signing their child up before it is born in the hope of getting in.“More centres are definitely needed. It’s really difficult for parents.“My heart really goes out to parents that have jobs waiting for them.”Central Otago Reap educator Shona Bain said through her Strengthening Families role she comes across a lot of parents who need and want to return to work.She said in many cases the dad works, while the mum is at home with a young one.As a result, people are tightening their belts.She said the range of courses she offers, such as sewing classes, were often filling up as people looked at ways to save money.Shona was pleased to see Barnardos working to improve the situation.“I think it’s fantastic to meet the needs of our community. It will make all the difference for all these families that are on my books.”Barnardos has hosted information sessions for potential home-based educators in Alexandra and Wānaka over recent weeks, and the response has been positive, Rebecca said.“Several individuals are currently in the application process, and we’re confident these sessions will contribute to a growing network of passionate educators in Central Otago.”People who want to become a Barnardos Early Learning home-based educator need a passion for inspiring young children through daily activities, and a commitment to creating a positive difference for families.They will also need to provide a home environment that meets health and safety requirements, and a Level 4 New Zealand Certificate in Early Childhood Education and Care qualification - or be willing to enter a training programme to obtain one while working.Visit the Barnardos Early Learning website to find out more or phone 0800 227 627.

Central’s heritage talks proving popular
Central’s heritage talks proving popular

19 May 2024, 5:30 PM

Central Otago Heritage Trust’s winter series of heritage talks are back and proving popular again, with the first session fully booked next week.University of Otago honorary professor Daphne Lee is speaking on ‘Lake Manuherekia - a glimpse into our prehistoric past’ to a full house on May 29 at Alexandra’s Central Stories.Due to high demand, she will give the talk a second time, on May 30 at the Clyde Museum.Daphne will take the audience back to 19 -16 million years ago, when the 5,600 square km ancient lake provided a haven for many diverse life forms including fish, water birds, crocodilians, forests and ferns. Daphne Lee, BSc PhD (Otago) specialises in paleobotany, paleontology and paleoecology. PHOTO: University of OtagoThe Heritage Talk is the first in a series about objects chosen for the Central Museums 100 project.The Stromatolite fossil, from Lake Manuherekia, is one of the objects chosen by the team at Central Stories Museum and Art Gallery.Entry is by koha (donation) with proceeds going to the hosting museum.The talk runs from 6.30pm - 8.00pm, and seats need to be booked online.Two other heritage talks are coming soon.On June 16, ‘Love and Marriage - Polly’s wedding dress’ is in Cromwell, presented by Toitū Otago Settlers Museum’s Sean Brosnahan.Secondly, coinciding with the Winter Stellar exhibition in Alexandra on August 20, night sky photographer Andy Davey will speak about the cultural and astronomical aspects of the night skies in the Southern Hemisphere. For more information on the talks go to the Whats on in The Central App.

Intensive winter grazing regulations repealed
Intensive winter grazing regulations repealed

19 May 2024, 5:15 PM

Otago farmers are being urged to continue operating good management practices this winter, and in line with the regulations around intensive winter grazing (IWG).Otago Regional Council (ORC) acting general manager regulatory Joanna Gilroy emphasised the excellent work farmers and the primary industry in general have undertaken on IWG during the past three years. "A lot of time and effort has resulted in positive outcomes, and we want people to keep up this excellent work,” she said.  “We’re very proud of the work completed by farmers’ engaging with ORC workshops, preparing their management plans, for following a pragmatic consent process and focusing on good management practice.” The Government recently announced that intensive winter grazing (IWG) regulations will be repealed, to be introduced into parliament this month, which will be in place for winter 2025. Joanna said for winter 2024, Otago farmers can expect ORC will continue to monitor compliance for IWG activities during the season, but will take a “pragmatic and risk-based approach to this programme.” “While legislative change is coming, our work to date has been very important and an excellent investment in our region. We know farmers need to plan ahead to make good on-farm decisions about where crops will go for next year. Once we know more about what rules may apply to this activity in the future, we’ll be able to update people,” she said. ORC wants farmers to continue to operate in line with good management practice and their resource consents this winter, given the key focus of these was the grazing management plans, which people have already completed. “We know farmers are well set for this winter and grazing is underway. Please keep your consents; they’ll give you all certainty and still apply to this winter." DairyNZ’s general manager farm solutions and policy Dr David Burger said dairy farmers have made “significant improvements” with their wintering practices in recent years.“Last winter, 86 per cent of Otago dairy farmers implemented at least five good management practices over winter, showcasing the range of tactics they use to care for their cows and environment."“We’ve seen farmers lifting the standards of animal care while working hard to protect the environment. They should be proud of the work they have done to date and look to continue this great practice in the seasons ahead even if they do not require a resource consent.”Joanna wants farmers who do not have a consent to continue to strive to meet the permitted criteria for the regulations and have a grazing management plan in place, which will support good on-farm decisions around grazing. “ORC’s compliance programme will continue for this winter, with a continued focus on education and level of risk assessment,” she said. 

Urgent overhaul of health systems to catch communicable diseases months behind
Urgent overhaul of health systems to catch communicable diseases months behind

18 May 2024, 7:39 PM

An urgent overhaul of health systems to better catch and control communicable diseases, from Covid-19 to measles, is months behind time, but authorities are promising to "avoid gaps".An improved surveillance system had been due to be in place by next month.Instead, a final independent report about what to do would be completed by September, the Ministry of Health told RNZ late on Friday.By what date it actually got implemented would depend on what was recommended.A series of reports since 2022 have identified "tension", duplication of roles and tangled accountability over surveillance, between the new National Public Health Service (NPHS) and its sibling the new Public Health Agency (PHA)."Urgent action on surveillance was identified," said an overarching report by a powerful ministerial advisory committee last November."Resolution of an agreed operating model in public health is urgent, particularly for communicable disease surveillance and clinical governance."It envisaged this being done by June 2024.With that now months off, the agencies would "work closely to reduce duplication of effort and to avoid gaps in public health surveillance", the ministry said in its statement on Friday.A strategy plan for integrating national surveillance nationwide would be released in June or July.The NPHS and PHA are the centrepiece of a $60m overhaul that sprang from the pandemic exposing the fragmentation of the country's then-dozen district public health services.They were meant to streamline the handling of outbreaks and potential outbreaks, and immunisations, but have struggled, documents showed.The aim was to set up "a world-class" surveillance system, that was expert, and defined "clear accountabilities". A contractor put in an initial analysis in March of what to do, monthly progress reports released under the Official Information Act said.The progress reports were only two pages each and provided very little information on the surveillance work.Aside from surveillance, "policy making process, health protection and emergency management, development and implementation of regulation development and a clinical governance framework" all had "issues", though strategising and local-to-national connections had improved, a 2023 review found.Covi-19 stretched system beyond its limitsThe third agency involved, Te Aka Whai Ora, the Māori Health Authority, is being disestablished by the government at the end of June, though the Waitangi Tribunal has agreed to an inquiry to be heard later this year.A fourth agency, Environmental Science and Research, provided oversight to the surveillance system.The priority diseases public health focuses on include measles, Covid-19, meningococcal disease, pertussis, mumps, tuberculosis, typhoid, enteric diseases, legionellosis, hepatitis B and sexually transmitted diseases.Covid-19 stretched the system beyond its limits. The dozen district public health units existing at the time, had so may different data systems they could often not share basic outbreak information with each other.A stopgap was rushed in - the National Contact Tracing Solution - which helped. That was shut down in February 2024, and was gradually being replaced up to 2025 by the National Disease Management System (NDMS).These systems depended on getting sensitive personal health information from people who may have been exposed to a disease, under the provisions of the Health Act 1956."There is still work underway to evaluate exactly what information will be captured for a given disease. This may include things such as a food diary in some instances," an interim privacy impact assessment on the NDMS said in February.Covid-19 is one of the priority diseases that public health focuses on. Photo: 123rf.comThe NDMS was being hosted within a "private isolated section" of Amazon's 'cloud' of data warehouse servers in Sydney.It used other tech from two other major suppliers Snowflake and Salesforce - but not artificial intelligence, the assessment said.Te Whatu Ora "routinely" used these tech companies to "extract, store and analyse data ", and they were assessed as OK to use for personal health information, the assessment said."Access, governance and privacy will be reviewed" as the data warehouse was built, it said.Cyber security was being assessed by an internal team, not an external one.A series of privacy protections - such as widespread encryption - and audit controls were detailed in the privacy impact assessment.The NDMS was using the same platform as for the Aotearoa Immunisation Register. This was "an appropriate choice and provides the necessary security", the assessment said.Decisions over who to communicate with when an analysis of contact tracing was triggered, would be made using another tool, the Consumer Population Identification and Registration Service (CPIR). This may depend on health checks or information from someone infected or their parents or guardians. The privacy impact assessment on the CPIR was not available on Te Whatu Ora's website.People could apply to Te Whatu Ora to see what information it held on them in these systems.Otherwise, "access to NDMS for users outside of Te Whatu Ora is strictly controlled".By far the highest risk rating was from "insider curiosity" for the NDMS system - scoring '18', with 'possible' odds of happening and 'major' consequences. This would be where an authorised user accessed or altered someone's information when not authorised to.It was "unlikely" NDMS information would be used for something other than what was intended, the interim assessment concluded.

Mayor's column: Why drop-ins?
Mayor's column: Why drop-ins?

18 May 2024, 5:30 PM

This week we concluded our drop-in sessions (including two on-line versions) as part of our Annual Plan consultation. If you have never been to one, when we hold a drop-in session, we will have a number of councillors (or when appropriate community board members) in a room, or sometimes outdoors at say a farmers market, ready to chat with you and answer your questions about what we are consulting on. They are labour intensive affairs but for me, they are hands-down the best way of having these discussions with the public. Some people don’t agree with me on that point and a few of them raised their concerns at the drop-ins over the last couple of weeks. What they would prefer is what we might called a typical town hall meeting, where the elected members would sit up the front, say a few things and then face questions. I’ve been up the front at dozens of these over the years and have also attended many more dozens of drop-ins, so I am going to claim some experience in which is the better way to go. If you are a person not afraid of public speaking (and many people rank that amongst their greatest fears) then a traditional town hall meeting could well be your preference, because you have the best chance of your view being heard by the most people. The problem is though, we generally hear the same thing from the same small group of people, which gives elected members a very small insight into the public view. And often those people have a particular axe to grind, leading to a meeting that provides lots of heat but very little illumination. And, that’s not what we are there for; the purpose of engagement is in the word, it is for elected members to engage with the public, not to just hear from the few who feel they can get up and speak. Drop-ins allow for a conversation to occur; in fact they allow for a multitude of conversations to occur, including some quite personal ones that I doubt very much the people concerned would want to engage in, in front of a room full of other people. They also allow for the korero to be spread out over time. Our live drop-ins this round have been between 4pm – 6pm with a view that people who aren’t working can come earlier and people who can come after work before heading home can do so a bit later. The on-line events were designed to hear from those who find those times inconvenient. A town hall meeting on the other hand would likely start at say 7.30 and roll through to 9 - 9.30, but don’t really have the ability for people to come, have a chat, have their questions answered and then leave as it suits them. The on-line drop-ins allowed for people to hear what’s going on and ask questions from the comfort of their own home or, importantly, watch the recorded version at their leisure. You can find that at Annual Plan Online Session -15 May 2024 here. Whether you made one of the meetings or not, we still really want to hear your thoughts, especially on what you think councils' priorities should be as we head into next year’s Long Term Plan, as that is the time we can make significant changes to what we are doing. Consultation closes on the 26th of May and you can find out all you need to know on the CODC website.

Can vitamin C really help prevent winter colds and flu?
Can vitamin C really help prevent winter colds and flu?

18 May 2024, 5:22 PM

It’s such an oft-repeated thing it has become common knowledge: Vitamin C is what we need when we are coming down with a cold or flu. Many swear it helps them prevent winter ills; others say it eases and erases symptoms and helps them bounce back if they do get struck down. But what is the truth here? Is vitamin C the cold cure and immunity boost we may believe it to be?Where did this idea come from?The link between vitamin C and immunity is well established, in the sense that this is an essential vitamin that we need for the proper functioning of our immune system. Vitamin C plays a role in various processes in the body, including the production of white blood cells and antibodies. Having enough vitamin C in our bodies is important for our overall immune function, and our overall health.This link was discovered way back before anyone had identified or named vitamins as vitamins, when it was found that sailors in the 18th century could recover quickly from scurvy when they ate citrus fruits, which we now know are high in vitamin C (it took until 1933 for the link to be fully understood).We now know that this vitamin is crucial for collagen synthesis - it helps our skin heal and helps maintain bone, tendons and blood vessels - and it helps us absorb iron from the foods we eat. It is also an antioxidant, protecting cells from damage caused by harmful free radicals, reducing oxidative stress and promoting overall cellular health.The idea of supplementing with vitamin C probably came from the fact that it is not stored in the body; we need to get it regularly from what we eat and drink in order to keep our levels up. The ‘insurance policy’ thinking that applies to most vitamins comes into play here: if we’re not getting enough from our food, we reason, why not top up with a supplement?Do vitamin C supplements help us with colds and flu?We know vitamin C is good for immunity. It is less clear, however, that supplements help with prevention or symptoms of colds and flu. Despite nearly a century of research, the evidence remains pretty mixed.Taking vitamin C regularly as a supplement does not seem to prevent colds or flu in most people. There is an exception: there have been some studies looking at people under extreme physical stress, such as marathon runners and soldiers in sub-arctic conditions, where it was found that if the participants started taking vitamin C two to three weeks before their strenuous activities, their risk of developing a cold was reduced by about half.For those of us who are not sub-arctic soldiers or marathoners, the evidence in large reviews shows that taking vitamin C does not prevent a cold. However, taking it regularly before you get the cold could shorten the amount of time you will be sick by around 10 percent. So a cold that would have lasted 10 days will be over in nine.It has also been found that people who always took vitamin C had slightly milder cold symptoms. This seems to be particularly the case for children.That said, taking vitamin C after your cold symptoms appear probably will not do any good. The evidence shows this does not have any effect on how long you will be ill for.What about liposomal vitamin C?Liposomal or lipo-spheric vitamin C seems to be all the rage. It comes with big claims - and a price tag to match. It is a form of vitamin C encapsulated in liposomes (tiny fat-like particles).There have been some studies looking at the effectiveness of liposomal vitamin C that suggest it appears to be absorbed better by the body. Whether that translates into any cold and flu benefits is not clear. Any downsides to taking it?Taking any vitamin C supplements in very high doses (more than 2000 milligrams a day, which is considered the safe upper limit) can cause diarrhoea and other digestive issues. There is no such risk in the vitamin C you get from food.The only other downside is really that it is not doing anything, and you are simply excreting any excess in the form of, as nutritionists like to put it, expensive urine.If not vitamin C… what can I take?There is no magical thing that will protect us from viral illness (which hopefully we all know by now). But health experts stress that looking after ourselves as well as possible will help our immune system to stay in top shape, so that when we do get hit with a virus, we can handle it OK.Nutritionist Nikki Hart is of this view, and cautions against singling out one vitamin as the solution.“Vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients - they all work to repel oxidative damage”, she explains.“So you can't just label vitamin C as protective.”She stresses that the best way to get our vitamins – including vitamin C – is through food. Citrus fruit and other colourful fruits and vegetables are all useful here, and getting lots of those on our plates means we will easily hit the recommended daily intakes. Hart said food is best not only because it offers a highly bioavailable form of vitamin C, but we also get other goodies, too, like fibre and other vitamins.She also said we need to remember all the things that boost immunity (and many other things too): physical activity, enough sleep, minimising alcohol and not smoking.“The immune system is bigger than just vitamins and minerals.”Lastly, there is one old bit of wisdom that might be true: one study found chicken soup is not only comforting, but it might have anti-inflammatory properties that lessen cold symptoms. In other words, spending the supplement money on fresh produce might be a better, and more enjoyable, way of avoiding or treating a cold.

Central Otago Fire Fighters to tackle Sky Tower
Central Otago Fire Fighters to tackle Sky Tower

17 May 2024, 5:45 PM

Central Otago firefighters are gearing up to conquer the Sky Tower Challenge today, in a bid to raise money for charity.Firefighters from across the district will join 1100 others from across the country for the event, seeing them race against the clock to the top of the Auckland Sky Tower.There are 1103 steps for them to climb, covering 51 floors, while carrying 25kg of fire fighting kit. The volunteers are made up of 10 men and women from Alexandra, nine from Cromwell, four from Clyde, one from Omakau and four from Naseby. One, Phil Flanagan, of Naseby is doing it for the 8th time. The firefighters, who already give up their time to protect our community, have been training hard, and fundraising harder, to raise money for Leukaemia and Blood Cancer New Zealand.Every day, eight New Zealanders are diagnosed with blood cancer.The Alexandra Team has raised over $16,500, and Central Otago crews have collectively raised over $28,000. Funds raised go directly to Leukaemia and Blood Cancer New Zealand, with flights and accommodation costs coming out of each competitor’s pocket.Jay Toth, Mitch Stringer, and Quinton Wicks ready to climb up a hill wearing full fire-fighting gear for training. PHOTO: Mitch StringerCentral Otago fundraising efforts will be added to the $1.4 million already raised by New Zealand this year.It is the 20th anniversary of the Firefighter Sky Tower Challenge, a fundraising event that has now raised more than $13 million dollars towards those fighting leukaemia and blood cancer in New Zealand. Mitch Stringer said the Alexandra brigade have been attending this event for more than 17 years.“At the time Alexandra Volunteer Fire Brigade was one of the first brigades from the South Island to participate.”Now, four volunteer fire brigades from Central Otago are ready to suit up and tackle the challenge, all for a great cause.Keep an eye up for results in a follow-up article once the teams return.Donations can still be made through the Fire Fighters challenge.

Naseby to showcase its offerings via info panels
Naseby to showcase its offerings via info panels

17 May 2024, 5:30 PM

Naseby could soon be home to information panels, thanks to an initiative driven by Naseby Vision.Meg Garner and Elly Campbell, who are representatives of the group, spoke at the recent Maniototo Community Board meeting, putting forward their case for financial support to help make the project happen.They said the sign aims to inform visitors about sites of interest and activities in the township.It comes on the back of observations that many visitors use the public toilets, but don’t take the time to explore the town’s many attractions.The aim was to create a sign that would showcase what the town has to offer and therefore make people stay longer.“The whole reason behind it is many times we watch visitors come in, park up, look around, do a u-turn, go to the toilet and head back out,” Meg said.An area, to the left of the town's toilets, is one possible location for the information panels. PHOTO: Supplied“Basically, we think this information map will be for people to understand what Naseby has.”Elly agreed, adding that the signage would also help people understand where things are in the town.She said some visitors have been known to bypass the town centre to get to their accommodation.“We think Naseby has a lot to offer and we’d like it more visible and [that is] why we’d like to put a notice map up.”Naseby Vision plans to work with the Information Centre and wider community to complete the project.The board accepted the level of significance the information panels would have, and allocated $2500 to the cause from the promotions grants budget.However, the grant is subject to meeting consent requirements and Central Otago District Council’s approval of the location, size and design of the signage.

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